Cheeps from Hunter-McMain

From Concept to Completion. Creative Advertising and Graphic Design Services.


Cool Off in August With “Vintage Mint”

Images courtesy of http://www.hawaiikawaii.net/. (Left) Color Marketing Group’s August Color Alert (center), and http://www.polyvore.com/ (right)

Images courtesy of http://www.hawaiikawaii.net/ (left) Color Marketing Group’s August Color Alert (center), and http://www.polyvore.com/ (right).

August in Houston is always hot, and this year, it’s record-breaking! Cool off a little with this month’s spotlight color, “Vintage Mint.” We’re loving this light, refreshing shade of green for everything from ads, to accessories…to cocktails.

There's nothing like a classic mint julep! Image courtesy of https://cocktailvultures.files.wordpress.com

There’s nothing like a classic mint julep! Image courtesy of https://cocktailvultures.files.wordpress.com

Plus, we don’t like to brag (too much), but as you can see from our blog’s color palette, we liked “vintage mint” before it was cool (pun intended)!

If this cute dude can figure out how to rock vintage mint, you can, too! Then you’ll be as cute as he is! Image courtesy of CMG.

If this cute dude can rock vintage mint, you can, too! Then you’ll be as cute as he is! Image courtesy of CMG.

According to the experts at Color Marketing Group (CMG):

“Vintage Mint has its roots in mid-century design…[but with] a distinctly modern edge… Always fresh, but now a bit daring, this new version has the energy to take on fashion, graphics, industrial design and transportation. Its daring has brought diversity, as it takes on unexpected roles in menswear, accent furnishings, and kitchen appliances.

Take a cool, fresh breath, with Vintage Mint.”

We couldn’t have said it better ourselves! Take a cue from the experts and incorporate vintage mint as a fun, fresh addition to your next ad or postcard.


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Follow Our New Marketing Campaign Week 5

Business Tips and Trends

This week our marketing meeting consisted of unifying our look and theme throughout our campaign. We will have the campaign running on our website, on our Facebook page, on our Blog, Twitter page and in our monthly email blasts. When we brought all these pieces together, we realized we were using different fonts and styles in the website, the Blog, Facebook page and our email blast. We liked certain elements in all pieces and decided to carry the theme (or look) throughout each piece to unify our campaign. We discovered using the same fonts and illustration styles would bring it all together. Did you notice the new design on our Blog blast we send weekly? Our Blog masthead, Facebook page, and our website page to “The Cheeps” are not exactly alike but share the same fonts, styles, illustrations and theme.

It is important to always step back and evaluate your work. You could have someone who is not a designer look at your marketing pieces from a different point of view–the view of a potential client. Do you have your audience targeted? Many advertising agencies use Focus Groups to get feedback on their marketing efforts. When creating a marketing campaign, we can help define your goals, help establish the concept, implement the plan, and we can continue to modify your work based on results of your efforts. That is what we did for our own campaign. We hope you are learning from our marketing campaign efforts.

Follow along as next week we will present our website page for “The Cheeps.”

MarketingPuzzlePieces


Following Our New Marketing Campaign Week 3

Moving right along in our marketing campaign, we are applying the new “Cheeps” look to our Blog and Email Blasts. We have created a masthead for our Blog, keeping the same colors and background icon. Using our new pledge–“On Time • On Budget” and superheroes, and a call to action make up the masthead.

We continue working on our webpage that has both the Postcards and Websites as a landing page for special offers and links to the individual websites of each. As with all marketing campaigns, be consistent with your logos, colors and theme as it’s the first thing people see and will stick in their minds as they are trying to remember you company.

Your logo and theme should offer a clue as to what kind of business you are in. Colors convey specific feelings in the people who see them. What do our colors convey? See our Blog “Corporate Colors Evoke Emotions” posted on 9/11/13.

As we transform the Cheep-Cheep logos, we hope you will follow along as we prepare our advertising and marketing ideas. Next week we should be ready to show you our website’s home page.

BlogMasthead_885x252_vs2


Follow Our Marketing Campaign Week 2

So last week, we told you we were ramping up our Cheep-Cheep Postcards and Cheep-Cheep Websites marketing. Our cartoon of our mascot has taken on the role of superheroes–one for our postcard (direct mail) business and one for our website development/design business. We have made several alterations to make them more superhero-ish! We are also celebrating our 25th anniversary here at Hunter-McMain, advertising and design firm so naturally, as a small division of Hunter-McMain, Inc., we will include ‘The Cheeps” in the celebration.

We liked the chalkboard-look that is trending, so we are combining our superheroes with the chalkboard look for our Facebook cover photo and Blog masthead. You will see the new look on our Facebook page. With our new marketing campaign, we have made a new pledge–“ON TIME • ON BUDGET”–so we are including our pledge. Follow along with us next week to see the look of our eBlasts and website landing page. We are creating info-graphics to explain our business… Visually, you will understand how we can be of service to you.

TheCheepsHeroes


Follow Our New Marketing Campaign

For the next few weeks, CheepCheep Postcards and Cheep Cheep Websites are creating a new marketing campaign for our 25th Anniversary. We are pumping up the look of our mascots-“The Cheeps” and you can watch our progress. This past week we started the project by redrawing our Cheep Chicks. Sometimes an idea comes and you have to write it down immediately. Many ideas are first drawn on a napkin or scrap paper… in this case, it was a mailer found in a magazine. The idea came in the middle of the night and it was the closest paper to put a thought down. See how we started from there? Our drawings started out a bit rounder Superheroes, but then thought we needed to create them to be buff and muscular.

SuperchickPROGRESS

And here is where we are with the mascot drawings, today.

CheepsSuperHeroes

 

The first place our “Cheeps” will appear is in our Blog and Facebook marketing. We hope you’ll follow along to see how the process is done to create a new marketing campaign. Next week, we will be updating a new look for our Blog to match our superhero chicks and announce our 25th year in business.


Typesetting the “Old Fashioned Way”

OldFashionedTypeSetting

Way before computers came into the picture, graphic designers would have to “spec the type” manually to layout an advertisement. This was done by figuring out your designated area where the copy would go and fit specific fonts and columns to the width of your area. A printer would compose and lock movable type into the bed of a press, ink it and press paper against it to transfer the ink from the type and creates an impression of the paper. In practice, letterpress also included other forms of print presses, such as wood ingravings, photo etched plates and were used along side the metal type in a single operation. Until the second half of the 20th century, letterpress remained the primary way to print. Then we switched to typesetting companies that prepared the text for the graphic designer.

Before the 1980s, practically all typesetting for publishers and advertisers was performed by specialty typesetting companies. These companies performed keyboarding, editing and production of paper or film output, and formed a large component of the graphic arts industry. The typesetting companies would send out a representative and help you achieve this. The rep gave the graphic designer special rulers (see illustration). These rulers aren’t quite obsolete, but it seems as though no one ever specs type anymore. The reps would return with the paper output of text to put onto boards to layout your design. Waxing and pasting this text output was an art in itself.  If there was a misspelled word, some times you would cut out the word and re-paste it. This was also an art as a large camera would scan the final piece. Type on a curve was done manually too. As the computer arrived on the desktops of artist, the letterpress craft disappeared.

Luckily, computers do this automatically today, but composition, placement of text is still important and takes a graphic designer to arrange this to maximum readership. 


Advertising that Works!

3M Advertising

“Break it and you can take it!”

Our Friday’s feature of advertising that works: In this photo you see an advertisement for 3M Security Glass. This innovative idea shows just how safe their glass is by putting thousands of dollars inside and placed on a busy street corner. I wonder how many people actually tried to crash open the glass.