Cheeps from Hunter-McMain

From Concept to Completion. Creative Advertising and Graphic Design Services.


Illustration and Photos Combo

Advertising that Works!

We love the combination of the drawing and photography for the Panamericana School of Art and Design. There are a couple of other ads with the same combo of art and photography of the city that make it a wonderful campaign. This school is in Brazil and is a creation from the Sao Paulo, Brazil BBDO advertising agency. We hope you like this week’s Advertising That Works!

Panamericana


Follow Our Marketing Campaign Week 2

So last week, we told you we were ramping up our Cheep-Cheep Postcards and Cheep-Cheep Websites marketing. Our cartoon of our mascot has taken on the role of superheroes–one for our postcard (direct mail) business and one for our website development/design business. We have made several alterations to make them more superhero-ish! We are also celebrating our 25th anniversary here at Hunter-McMain, advertising and design firm so naturally, as a small division of Hunter-McMain, Inc., we will include ‘The Cheeps” in the celebration.

We liked the chalkboard-look that is trending, so we are combining our superheroes with the chalkboard look for our Facebook cover photo and Blog masthead. You will see the new look on our Facebook page. With our new marketing campaign, we have made a new pledge–“ON TIME • ON BUDGET”–so we are including our pledge. Follow along with us next week to see the look of our eBlasts and website landing page. We are creating info-graphics to explain our business… Visually, you will understand how we can be of service to you.

TheCheepsHeroes


Follow Our New Marketing Campaign

For the next few weeks, CheepCheep Postcards and Cheep Cheep Websites are creating a new marketing campaign for our 25th Anniversary. We are pumping up the look of our mascots-“The Cheeps” and you can watch our progress. This past week we started the project by redrawing our Cheep Chicks. Sometimes an idea comes and you have to write it down immediately. Many ideas are first drawn on a napkin or scrap paper… in this case, it was a mailer found in a magazine. The idea came in the middle of the night and it was the closest paper to put a thought down. See how we started from there? Our drawings started out a bit rounder Superheroes, but then thought we needed to create them to be buff and muscular.

SuperchickPROGRESS

And here is where we are with the mascot drawings, today.

CheepsSuperHeroes

 

The first place our “Cheeps” will appear is in our Blog and Facebook marketing. We hope you’ll follow along to see how the process is done to create a new marketing campaign. Next week, we will be updating a new look for our Blog to match our superhero chicks and announce our 25th year in business.


Typesetting the “Old Fashioned Way”

OldFashionedTypeSetting

Way before computers came into the picture, graphic designers would have to “spec the type” manually to layout an advertisement. This was done by figuring out your designated area where the copy would go and fit specific fonts and columns to the width of your area. A printer would compose and lock movable type into the bed of a press, ink it and press paper against it to transfer the ink from the type and creates an impression of the paper. In practice, letterpress also included other forms of print presses, such as wood ingravings, photo etched plates and were used along side the metal type in a single operation. Until the second half of the 20th century, letterpress remained the primary way to print. Then we switched to typesetting companies that prepared the text for the graphic designer.

Before the 1980s, practically all typesetting for publishers and advertisers was performed by specialty typesetting companies. These companies performed keyboarding, editing and production of paper or film output, and formed a large component of the graphic arts industry. The typesetting companies would send out a representative and help you achieve this. The rep gave the graphic designer special rulers (see illustration). These rulers aren’t quite obsolete, but it seems as though no one ever specs type anymore. The reps would return with the paper output of text to put onto boards to layout your design. Waxing and pasting this text output was an art in itself.  If there was a misspelled word, some times you would cut out the word and re-paste it. This was also an art as a large camera would scan the final piece. Type on a curve was done manually too. As the computer arrived on the desktops of artist, the letterpress craft disappeared.

Luckily, computers do this automatically today, but composition, placement of text is still important and takes a graphic designer to arrange this to maximum readership.