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From Concept to Completion. Creative Advertising and Graphic Design Services.


Advertising that Works: Oreo Thins For the Win

Oreos, but…better for you? The same great taste, but…smaller? Brilliant!

At least that’s what the new Oreo Thins Ads would have us believe, and we think they’re doing a very convincing job.

Image courtesy of static.thefrisky.com.

Image courtesy of static.thefrisky.com.

The latest series of ads for the new Oreo Thins (a permanent addition to the Oreo cookie family) emphasizes a “sleek” and “clean” feel with few words and large, impactful images of the cookies–which look totally delicious, just smaller.

Image courtesy of delish.com.

Image courtesy of delish.com.

The way they emphasize how “thin” the cookies are in the ad designs play into a cultural interest in healthier eating, as well as the constant shift toward slimmer, sleeker products in the tech world. For instance, the ad above shares some similarities with this ad for the Apple iPad Mini:

Image courtesy of www.hightech-edge.com.

Image courtesy of http://www.hightech-edge.com.

The iPad is sexy, so Oreos are sexy, too! The Oreo Thin ad campaign is also making clever use of celebrity and social media–for instance, not long ago, actor and comedian Neil Patrick Harris sent out this tweet:

NPH Oreo Tweet

Accompanied by this charming Instagram post:

NPH Oreos instagram

If that doesn’t make you want Oreo Thins, I don’t know what will.

For these reasons, we have to officially declare the Oreo Thins campaign to be some Advertising that Seriously Works!

Oreo Has a History of Quality Ads…Check it Out:


Top 10 Things Designers Hate, Number 6: Speaking of Fonts…

Welcome back to our Blog series, “Top 10 Things Designers Hate!” We’ve covered ads with too much text, “Borrowed” images, reading the rate card and, most recently, the impact of fonts on your advertisement. It’s hard to over-emphasize how much fonts affect your ads. So, speaking of fonts, our number six thing designers hate is…

6) When You Don’t Embed Your Fonts

Imagine this familiar scenario: You have a font you want to use. You type up your copy in Microsoft Word, save it as a .docx document, and send it to your designer. Unfortunately, your designer doesn’t have that font on file, which means that when the document is opened on your designer’s computer, it defaults to some other font…like maybe Wingdings 3.

Wingdings: Cute on dogs. Not on your ad. Image courtesy of cafepress.com.

Wingdings: Cute on dogs. Not on your ad. Image courtesy of cafepress.com.

The formatting you worked so hard on is ruined, and your designer has no idea what you were trying to send. Time to start over.

All this trouble can be avoided by the simple process of embedding your fonts. What does that mean?

“Embedding” fonts means including the font you want to use as part of the document when you send it to your designer. This can be done quite simply: often, when saving ad document as a PDF you will be prompted to embed the fonts. That’s about as easy as it gets!

If this doesn’t happen (like if you’re using an older version of Word or Adobe Acrobat) you can follow these simple instructions here or here.

And voila! This simple process avoids confusion and keeps communicating with your designer clear and efficient. Everybody wins!

Related Articles:


Burt’s Bees

Advertising that Works!

The advertising team at Baldwin& has created a stellar campaign for Burt’s Bees®. Several ads feature their moisturizing lip balm with photos and illustrations. Headlines read, “Uncap Flavor.” Then they describe the flavor being uncapped. What we like about the ad is the simplicity of the design and the whimsy of the drawings. As we were admiring the print ads we discovered Burt’s Bees® TV commercial with all the photos and illustrations set to a delightful tune. You can watch it here.

Each Friday we like to highlight a featured advertisement or commercial that is creative, amuses us, and works in selling the product or service. Join us here every Friday for Advertising That Works!

BurtsBees


Kraft Zesty Italian Dressing Gets Attention!

In the ad business we think when the audience remembers your commercial or ad that’s a good thing. Sometimes even a commercial that isn’t so great gets attention because people remember their feelings when seeing it. For instance, how did last week’s Friday “Advertising that Works!” grab you? Was it kind of awkward and uncomfortable to see a boy pregnant? Well, this week’s “Advertising that Works!” may only grab the female audience. And it sure is memorable for some! In fact, this commercial on YouTube has been viewed 1,792,637 times since it was posted nearly 2 months ago!  Take a look at the Kraft Zesty Italian dressing commercial that gets our attention… Which means that it works!


Chicago’s Shocking ‘Pregnant Boy’ Ads

pregnant-boy-ad

He looks like the typical high school kid – shaggy hair, low-riding jeans, a skateboard – except for one startling difference: A pregnant belly! Chicago’s Department of Public Health created an ad campaign that could not be ignored. The headline reads, “Unexpected? Most teen pregnancies are.” Then short advice: “Avoid unplanned pregnancies and STI’s. Use condoms. Or wait.”

BeYouBeHealthy.org

Chicago’s teen birth rate has decreased in recent years, but it still remains one of the highest in the nation. Hence the need for something dramatic. They say the shift from girls to boys is enough reason to see the ads as a success. How can we make our next advertising campaign a success!

BoyPregnant_article